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20100914
20100914
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
powerful. jennifer stefano and dallas tea party founder. welcome to both of you. jennifer, we are already getting reports that some of the tea party candidates are surging significantly. the delaware race more dramatically. what do you think is going on here, jen? >> i think the republican establishment very much underestimated the tea party and our organizational abilities and ability to raise money. i think when we first came on the scene they like to pat our heads and say great job protesting and hold up the signs and make trouble for the democrats and when we wanted to have a say in our own party they balked and they thought we would event waltly go away and go back to our homes our jobs. we went home and organized and got ready and now taking it straight to the people and the people are working to get the candidates elect. >> the argument has been among the traditional party of establishment that you might like and fall in love with a tea party candidate but you will sour quickly when you see how he or she fares in a general election. we have seen cases where initially come out the g
of jennifer pettitte going to that bank. this, as her husband, mr. william pettitte, takes the stand today. >> what an emotional day. we'll e go to that in a little bit. >>> we begin with a high-stakes day in politics. jon karl is covering it all. >> reporter: good morning, george. as you said, there's seven primaries today. but the eyes of the political world are all on tiny delaware. it's here that the tea party movement is trying to score its biggest upset yet. meet christine o'donnell, the tea party candidate most feared by the republican establishment. >> there is a tidal wave coming to delaware. and we -- we are riding it. and he is drowning in it. >> reporter: she has twice run for the senate. and twice lost. but this time, she has sarah palin. >> hi. this is governor sarah palin. vote for christine o'donnell for u.s. senate this tuesday. >> reporter: o'donnell is up against one of delaware's most popular political figures, congressman mike castle. republican leaders think he is their only chance of winning joe biden's old senate seat. >> if she were, by some miracle to be our nomin
arabia. national security correspondent jennifer griffin tells us what the u.s. is selling. it would be the largest arms deal in u.s. history. 60 billion dollars in military aircraft to saudi arabia's air force over the next ten years. the pentagon officials say the deal would include 84 f-15 fighter jets. 70 apache helicopters, 72 blackhawks and 60 little birds followed by a 30 billion dollar package to improve saudi's naval defenses. if congress approves the sale. it's designed to send a signal to neighboring iran, whose march toward nuclear weapons is of growing concern to its arab neighbors. >> every message that the u.s. sends is being heard loud and clear in iran and certainly any sign that the u.s. and saudi arabia are deepening their defense relationships, certainly any sign that saudi arabia will have a stronger deterrent force, i think, enters into the calculations of the iraniaeye rain. >> reporter: there could be a political component. boeing argues the sale could support up to 77,000 jobs in 44 states. the u.s. doesn't buy f-15's anymore and the line was slated to be cl
's bring in jennifer pomery. let me ask you both, doesn't everybody want a tax cut? you don't want to answer the question. >> no, i do. >> the polling is interesting in that the majority of people don't support extending the bush tax cuts. they don't. when you say should we extend the bush tax cuts, 52% of americans say no. i think it's because they think those taxes go to rich people. but then when you say should you extend them for rich people or only the middle class. they pick only the middle class. i think what's great about what john boehner has done is he has clarified the difference. >> try something, if nothing happens, everybody's taxes go up in january, right? who wins then? if we go to the voting booth and everybody's taxes are going up, who wins then? >> it's not going to happen in a vacuum. there will be a debate. if they can be the can't get a bill passed, democrats will say, this is what it's about. >> but won't people blame the democrats because they're in power? >> mr. boehner helped make this case. if you're able to say, i wanted to vote for tax cuts, they wanted
. . he is the lone survivor of the attack. the defense says, yes, my client raped and killed jennifer petitt. the key here is will this deft steven hayes get the death penalty or not? he offered to plead guilty if prosecutors took the death penalty off the table. prosecutors said no, that's how airtight they believe their case is. he and another man allegedly broke into the home three years ago in a suburban upscale neighborhood here in krthd. middle of the night the family was sleeping. tortured them. led them to a bank to take out $15,000. ended up killing them and burned their house down. on the stand today the lone survivor told in his testimony, told the jury the defendant said if he gives them what yo want we won't hurt you. i may have yelled out hey, and then a voice yelled back at him saying don't worry. it's all going to be over in a couple of minutes. in fact, prosecutors have said that that the testimony that the jury will hear, the audience will hear in this case, will rock your inner core because of what this man went through. he said he was tied up by his wrist an inkels
of dr. petit's family, his wife, jennifer and two daughters. >> the families are ready for this process to begin. and our hope is for justice to prevail. >> reporter: petit is supposed to describe for the first time, the home invasion. the sexual assaults. and the fire set to the home. and for the first time, we saw the surveillance image of mrs. petit at the bank. the bank teller that day was among the first to testify. telling the court that mrs. petit's hands were a little shaky. and that the wife said she had to withdraw $15,000 because her family was being held hostage. the bank teller said she alerted the bank manager, who also testified. telling the court that mrs. petit showed pictures of her daughters in her wallet. the court heard the 911 call from the bank manager who described the wife this way. she is petrified. then, dr. petit's neighbor took the stand. he heard someone calling his name. he opened his garage and saw a man lying in the driveway. i did not recognize him at first. his face was banged up. it just didn't look like dr. petit. he testified that inside the home, t
this family, drove jennifer hawk petit to the bank and told her to take out a large sum of money. she went in and did that, the bank tellser is the one who called 911. we expect to get the 911 tape a little bit later. she thought she could pay these would-be killers off. it didn't work. they went back to the house and killed this family, except for dr. petit who was also tortured and burned the house down. once his trial happens, the other suspect will be on trial. prosecutors say they have a mound of evidence and they said that the testimony here is going to rock the inner core of the jury because it was such a brutal attack, richard. >> jeff, we have to think about mr. petit, dr. petit. how is he holding up knowing he lost his wife and two daughters and having to relive all this again. >> i talked to him during jury selection a couple months ago and i said how do you stand there in court. >> jeff rossen live on that story and hope things go well for him in this trial. i'm richard lui in for chris jansing. i'll see you back here at 3:00 eastern when the u.s. about to conduct the biggest a
washington knows best, we can it will what you money you are going to keep and not. >> thank you, jennifer and ryan. a hot hand. >>> up next, what's harry reid doing with the military and his don't ask don't tell policy and he wants a vote. what happens inside the military if they get rid of don't ask and don't tell? we're going to talk about those questions, the politics and reality of getting rid of don't ask don't tell and having open service for people, which looks to be the future. the question is when is it coming and how are people going to handle it? this is "hardball," only on msnbc. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want to help when the unexpected happens. whatever you want to do, members project from american express can help you take the first step. vote, volunteer, or donate for the causes you believe in at membersproject.com. take charge of making a difference. [ male announcer ] at ge capital, we're out there every day with clients like jetblue -- financing their fleet, sharing our expertise, and working with people who are changing the face of bus
army post in italy with his wife, jennifer, when the call came from washington. >> my heart started racing pretty fast at that time, and then when he said president barack obama, it just started really pounding. >> reporter: he was just 22 years old at the time, during this battle, which abc news cameras captured. it was a fight so intense, an ambush so sudden, that soldiers were lying wounded within seconds. among them, giunta's closest friend, sergeant josh brennan, shot multiple times and cut off from the other soldiers. >> to tell the story about that day hurts me. >> reporter: staff sergeant brett perry back in afghanistan for a second tour was with giunta on that frigid mountain during the battle. >> i can't even begin to describe how intense it was. the most intense whizzes i've ever heard from bullets just going right over us. >> reporter: with two taliban fighters now dragging his friend josh brennan away giunta charged right into the ambush, killing one of the taliban fighters and chasing the other away. giunta pulled his friend brennan to safety. >> sergeant giunta was ju
of illinois. joining me now to talk about this is deputy personal finance editor jennifer merritt. she oversaw the research for the "wall street journal." the bottom line here is for that first job, businesses seem to be preferring not the ivy leagues, but others. these are no slouch schools. this is not like, oh, gosh, let's take second best. those are great schools. why, though, this over the ivy leagues? >> for these entry level jobs people are hoping to grow candidates into the company with. and so one of the reasons is they come very academically prepared. they've all had a major. so they've really got the great, deep skills in a subject. and then because they've got to really fend for themselves at these big schools and take advantage of various resources and network and the wide networks. they're also sort of able to come in, hit the ground running, and that well roundedness. >> ivy league graduates are seen as less -- >> they're less technically prepared in a lot of ways. most ivy league schools don't have majors in a traditional sense, don't have a lot of that bread and butter course
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)